Those sensual Parisians!

The French are known for their enjoyment of all things sensual – food, wine, art, sex… and its not only a recent phenomena. Some of the most daring, expressive and indulgent creations originated in historical France. Poets, writers, artists, chefs… and magazine publishers.

Chéri Hérouard

I love browsing through the titillating old covers of La Vie parisienne (the Parisian Life) magazine. Founded in 1863, it was published without interruption until 1970. When the magazine changed hands in 1905, the new editor Charles Saglio changed its format to suit the modern reader, transforming it from a general arts magazine into a mildly risqué erotic publication.

I imagine one of the main attractions for readers were the covers and full page color illustrations by popular Art Nouveau and Art Deco illustrators of the time such as George Barbier, Chéri Herouard, Georges Léonnec and Maurice Milliere.

If you like a your art a little bit naughty, you can immerse yourself in one of the largest collections of La Vie parisienne magazine artwork in the UK at The Advertising Archives

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l’amour de moi…

an erotic find

It’s no secret. I cannot resist the lure of a second-hand book. Something about the mystery of who owned it before… How many owners – and how many others – had held it in their hands and read the very same pages? Words woven by a stranger, most likely no longer living. A voice reaching out from the past, still influencing the living.

Even less can I resist a book with titillating content. The title, ‘An Anthology of Erotic Prose’ can hardly be misinterpreted. I decided on the spot it would be mine, and I would savor the contents a little at a time.

My first expedition into new erotic landscapes was with Violette Leduc, a French author and protegée of Simone de Beauvoir.

Born the illegitimate daughter of a servant girl, young Violette spent most of her childhood suffering from an ugly self-image. Life become more interesting at boarding school where she experienced lesbian affairs with a classmate and a music instructor who was fired over the incident. Not surprising, the main subjects of her writing are female love and desire.

erotic prose blog

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Rituals of Lust

As promised – I’d love to share with you a short excerpt from my short story ‘Esther Jones and the Temple of the Moon’, recently published in the RWA Spicy Bites Anthology ‘Masks’. I hope you enjoy reading it half as much as I did writing it. But first, a quick intro…

Egypt 1939 AD: Esther Jones, archaeologist turned treasure hunter, unearths an unusual ritual mask in an ancient temple. When she shows the find to her business partner, they discover first-hand the sensual spells woven into the mask with her ancestor’s long dark hair, 4333 years earlier.

Egypt 2394 BC: With her village dying of famine, high priestess Hesta takes unprecedented steps to enhance the annual fertility ritual, transforming it into a true union between the bull god and the moon goddess. Will Hesta be rewarded with the survival of her tribe or punished for her audacity?

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marathon lovemaking sessions and an e-book sale

So… as I’ve been editing my 130,000 word novel (which I have now finished and am about to send off for a structural edit). Part of the process was reducing (or removing) some of the more intense or ‘unsuitable’ love scenes. One of the scenes I cut back was at the sensual ‘climax’ of the story, the first time my heroine her dark and damaged Champagne producer give in to their lust.

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Describing each act in a night of lovemaking was a bit extreme, so I removed the little one in the middle, and edited the rest down to their scintillating essence.

Circumstances have my lovers sharing a one bedroom cottage at Henri’s vineyard, but instead of arguing about who gets the bed, they fall in to it together.

One day I hope you’ll read my debut work of sensual women’s fiction, to read the scenes that made the cut, but for now, here’s a little tease…

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A luscious tease

I recently had the pleasure of seeing The Art of the Teese, curated by and starring the legend herself, Dita Von Teese. In my opinion (apologies to Dita) the highlight of the show was Australian performer Zelia Rose. Her act embodies the spirit of Josephine Baker – and sent shivers over my entire body. I’m convinced watching her perform was second only to going back in time to see Josephine herself dance.

zelia rose

To give you a taste of Zelia’s act, I found this on youtube from 2014. It was brilliant back then, and is much more polished now.

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The Little Death

I have a confession to make: I adore drinking wine – white or red – and have been a fan of rosé, especially the dry varieties, for many years. As a lover of most things French and sensual, on a recent mini break to Queensland’s ‘granite belt’, I couldn’t resist ordering the La Petite Mort Rosé from a restaurant wine list.

The cool, high country and decomposed granite soils of the area make for unique and excellent wines – the label got my attention, andthe wine did not disappoint!

Pnot_Rose_16-01

http://www.lapetitemort.com.au/

As I was drinking, my curiosity sparked and I did a little digging about the origins of the term ‘La Petite Mort’. The little death as a metaphor for orgasm is fairly mainstream, and has been used as a title for many things, including restaurants and a ballet, and is referenced widely in music lyrics.

The term was in use as early as the 16th century, originally referring to a fainting fit, later enlarged to include ‘nervous spasm’. More recently the term has been used to describe a sexual orgasm as a spiritual as well as physical release, an orgasm so intense it feels like an out of body experience; the feeling of having expended life force, of having died a little.

Surely, a little warm death is even better? (sung beautifully by Stringmansassy):

La petite mort is commonly used in literature, although not always in a sexual way (i.e. Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles) and literary critic Roland Barthes used the term to describe the experience of reading great literature.

I’m sure I’ll find a way to slip it into my writing…

I’ll leave you with a beautiful but sad song…

a tout a l’heure…

Foot fetish or foot appreciation?

To some, the sight of a well-tended, attractive foot is a huge turn-on. Why is it that a high arch, elegant toes, foot jewellery and/or sexy shoes can turn a normally sensible person into a slavering sex slave?

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There are a few theories, but this is the one I particularly like:

According to the neuroscientiststhe part of the brain that relates to the genitalia and feet are located next to one other in the brain’s body image map, which can lead to some crossed wiring. The neurons in the brain that have to do with sensations in the foot are ‘neural neighbours’ to the neurons that have to do with sensations in the sexual areas. The theory is that the ‘couriers’ in the nervous system get crossed, which is why feet can be so erotic.

Other researchers have found the smell of feet is arousing  to some – the natural odour of feet can act like pheromones.

For men, interest in pretty peds may be because they don’t typically spend any time on their own feet, whereas women often make an effort to make theirs look attractive. The arches and natural curves of the woman’s foot can be as arousing as any feminine curve.

Then there’s ‘cue theory’ or imprinting – childhood experiences which may have a direct effect on a person’s erotic attraction to feet. Foot cues could originate from a very young age – as young as when a child is crawling, when they may see their mother’s feet more than any other part of her body. Thus, a foot can become associated with the positive feelings of a nurturing mother.

Ogi Ogas, a neuroscientist and co-author of A Billion Wicked Thoughts, explains, “Following cue theory, during a man’s critical period of sexual desire formation, his innate foot cue makes him more likely to pay attention to feet and makes him more receptive to foot-related stimuli. If through chance or culture he is then exposed to a strong foot-related experience—a woman sticking her foot in a thirteen-year-old’s face or watching your first girlfriend slowly unroll her black stockings—then the foot-related details of the experience are more likely to get imprinted.”

 

I can definitely appreciate how a lovely foot can be a turn-on, but from what I understand, having a fetish means that in order to be fully sexually aroused, you need to focus on one body part. In the case of podophilia, a foot fetish, the body part/s involved are the feet.

But there’s no reason you couldn’t call your love of a beautifully tended foot a fetish, if that’s what turns you on 😉

And if feet are your man’s Achilles heel, here are some positions he’ll love:

http://www.cosmopolitan.com/sex-love/positions/g8659598/foot-fetish-sex-positions/

Le Clos Tranquille

I had a lovely surprise today, while searching for a boring old document on my computer… I came across some photos I took on my visit to Giverny (Monet’s home from 1883 to 1926) more than 2 years ago. I don’t think I even glanced at these images when I got home, so it was like unwrapping a gift – and a beautiful reminder of my visit.

giverny

It was a gorgeous September day, the temperature was perfect (for eating icecream), the gardens blooming…

There is something magical about the light in Europe, so clear yet gentle, not like the harsh light I’m accustomed to at home in Australia (which is beautiful in its own way, especially when it is illuminating the beautiful blue skies and vibrant earth of the outback).

I thought I’d share my favourites with you. You may notice, as I have just discovered, I have a ‘thing’ for dahlias in their many forms. I always knew I had a weakness for French bees…

And of course there are the delicious stories of Monet’s women: his first wife, muse and model, Camille (below); the affair he supposedly had with his patron’s wife, Alice, who may have nursed Camille on her deathbed, and then became Monet’s second wife…

claude_monet-madame_monet_en_costume_japonais

Orgasms… the extremes some women will go to

There’s no denying orgasms are one of life’s more pleasurable – and for many of us, accessible – experiences. But if it wasn’t a simple pleasure? How far would you go to experience the sweet, if short, release of orgasm?

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These days genital plastic surgery is quite common, to make us look prettier ‘down there’ or in an attempt to make orgasm easier to achieve. The removal of the clitoral hood has been popular since the Victorians believed it to be superfluous and that exposing the glans clitoris would make women more responsive.

In fact, the hood is made up of erogenous tissue – it is a pleasure receptor in itself and protects the often too-sensitive clitoris (direct pressure can be painful), diffusing it’s sensitivity so sex can be a pleasurable, not an uncomfortable activity. And why would you willingly remove even a small piece of the organ packed with nerve endings, present in the body for the sole purpose of pleasure? Without it, wouldn’t we just be depriving ourselves of part of our erogenous anatomy? Continue reading